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Everything Wedding

DJ versus Live Band at the Reception: Part II June 26, 2009

Filed under: Vendors — jamiemae @ 7:00 am
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  DJ:  A really skillful DJ can really help to liven up the reception, and can engage with and respond to the audience.  He will know how to balance songs between slow and fast, different styles,  and set the right volume and feel to carry the event from dinner hour music through the last slow dance at the end of the night.  As with the band, he can announce the arrival of the wedding party, instruct people when to eat, announce the cake cutting, etc.  The benefit of a good DJ is that he / she can literally have 1000s of songs at the fingertips, and can take almost any request. He should be able to bring a very high quality sound and lighting system, if requested, and play any special songs you may desire.   As with the band, make sure they have experience performing at weddings, and get references. 
 
 Make sure your DJ knows the following at least 2 weeks prior to the big day:
 
1)     what time to arrive for their setup and sound check
2)     who their point of contact is
3)     where they can load and unload
4)     who will let them in
5)     where they can park
6)     what time to begin playing, timing of any special songs
7)     where their power outlet is located
8)     how much of a sound and / or lighting system they will need to bring
9)     attire (ie how formal)
10)  whether food and drinks are included with their fee.
11)  How they will be paid

 

DJs versus Live Band at the Reception: Part I June 25, 2009

Filed under: Vendors — jamiemae @ 7:00 am
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The decision about whether to hire a DJ or a Live band is an important one for your wedding to be special. The right music can make the whole night, and have your guests dancing the night away!  The choice comes down to several important personal factors as well considerations about the size and style of your event. The benefits and considerations of each choice is listed below:
 
Live band:  There is just something about the creative energy and spontaneity of a live band that can not be re-produced with a recording. Vocals are a lot more powerful when live, and good musicians can draw on the energy of each other and the audience to create a more inspired, powerful performance.  This in turn influences the audience.  Great music is also a visual experience, with lighting, and the physical motions of the performing adding a whole new dimension to the music.  Again, this is not possible with recorded music.   With a live band, make sure they can handle a variety of styles of music, especially those songs or styles you want to hear, and have experience performing at weddings.  Ask to see their songlist of most proficient songs, and try to go see a live public performance before hiring them.  References can also be very important.  Make sure you have the right space, sound system, and lighting requirements for the band, and work out agreement on any songs in particular you would like them to perform.  Make sure your band knows the following at least 2 weeks prior to the big day:
 
1)     what time to arrive for their setup and sound check
2)     who their point of contact is
3)     where they can load and unload
4)     who will let them in
5)     where they can park
6)     what time to begin playing, timing of any special songs
7)     where their power outlet is located
8)     how much of a sound and / or lighting system they will need to bring
9)     attire (ie how formal)
10)  whether food and drinks are included with their fee. 
11)  how they will be paid

 

Set-up for Your Musicians June 24, 2009

Filed under: Vendors — jamiemae @ 7:00 am
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It is important to plan ahead for musician set-up prior to the wedding service. Below are key questions to ask the musicians you hire.

Will you need to rent a piano or does the keyboardist have one he can bring? How about a small PA system for guitars, keyboards, vocals, etc.?

What space and power requirements do the musicians have?Will they require any sort of lighting? (playing in the dark is sometimes difficult and people will not be able to see the performers)

Do they know exactly what to play when?
Do you have a backup plan if there is an emergency, a musician is sick or a vocalist can not sing? 
(the performer can usually suggest an alternate, and hopefully can deal with such a situation professionally)
If the service is to be outside, is there a tent they can setup under in the case of drizzle, and is there any type of heat lamp if the temperature is below 60?  
(even a light drizzle can be very bad for guitars and electronic gear, plus any temp below 65 tends to make the fingers cold, and performing harder).

-Brent Moseley

 

PLANNING FOR MUSIC DURING THE SERVICE June 23, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized,Vendors — jamiemae @ 7:00 am
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Music is an essential element that can truly make a service special and set the tone for celebration and create a classy atmosphere.  The more unique, the more memorable!  Music is typically performed at 6 stages of the wedding:

1)     Before the service while people are walking in. This time works very well for a soloist, duo, or classical ensemble 
2)     As the wedding party is walking in (called the processional).  Also great for a soloist
3)     As the Bride and Groom are walking out (called the recessional)
4)     After the service, while guests are walking out.  Great for a soloist or duo
5)     During the wedding dinner
During the reception / dance hour / cake cutting

Its important to plan ahead, hire the right musicians early, and decide on songs early enough to give them plenty of time to prepare.  Unless they have excellent reading skills, a small ensemble (strings, horns, singer / piano, etc) will need on average one week per song when the music is something they have not performed before.  So, if they will perform 5 songs, give them at least 5 weeks notice.  Those that have experience performing at weddings may be able to make suggestions as to a song list – they will know through experience what works.  Piano music while people are walking in, during the wedding procession, and while people are leaving the service can be especially nice.

-Brent Moseley, Point of View

 

Guest Blogger – Entertainment June 22, 2009

Filed under: Vendors — jamiemae @ 7:00 am
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Finding the right entertainment is not always as easy as hiring a DJ and then seeing him at the wedding. My friend Brent Moseley, with Point of View Entertainment, has kindly agreed to be my guest blogger for the week. Brent has been gracing the Phoenix area with his musical talents since 1998. When he’s not entertaining, he teaches music to both children and adults. This week, Brent will discuss how to accommodate your musicians and what to consider when choosing between a live band and a DJ. 

To know more about Point of View and to listen to their talent, click here. Brent can be contacted at Mus123@cox.net or 480-229-5966.

 

Bridal Fashion Debut June 2, 2009

Filed under: Vendors — jamiemae @ 8:43 am
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In April, I talked about the pros and cons of bridal shows. Well, this Sunday you can form your own opinion. From 9:00-3:00 Sunday June 7, 2009, The Bridal Fashion Debut will be showing at the Phoenix Convention Center. This is a great opportunity to get ideas, meet and compare several vendors and talk to other brides. You can also win amazing things like a free honeymoon (I know someone who won two), champagne flutes, skin care products and the list goes on. Get your tickets and a map here.

 

Paying Vendors and Writing Thank You Notes May 21, 2009

Most vendors (if not all) will require payment on the day of your wedding. Depending on your contract, this could be before the ceremony or after the reception. The important part is making sure it happens. You wouldn’t want to come home from your honeymoon to be greeted by a collection agency or a nasty notice from vendors. So, I recommend having all payments ready before the day of the wedding and delegating someone else to distribute them. You won’t want to think about money on your wedding day. You’ll be too busy enjoying the best day of your life! So, here’s what you do.

Organize each payment in the form of check or cash and put them in separate envelopes with the name of the company and the contact person on each envelope. The envelopes should be sealed for safety. You can also include tips and a thank you note in these envelopes. Your wedding coordinator is an excellent person for the task of distributing payment, with one exception. The best man typically gives the officiant the tip. 

thank-youWriting thank you notes is an arduous task. In order to lighten your burden post-honeymoon, begin to write thank you’s for the gifts that are delivered to your house (or your parents’ house) before the wedding. You can have your maid of honor mail them the day after the wedding. You can also start to put your return address labels and stamps on envelopes for the thank you’s that you’ll write when you get home. I highly discourage you from making fill-in-the-blank thank you’s. I repeat: don’t make fill-in-the-blank thank you’s! It is very tacky and obvious when a guest receives a note with a form letter that has the name of the gift that just barely fits in the space after “Thank you for the ______________.” It’s especially bad when the pen color of the gift doesn’t match the pen color of the rest of the note. I don’t care if it does match or fit perfectly. Just don’t do it! It will make a far better impression on your guests if you write a genuine note after the wedding. Besides, you have a few months before etiquette comes calling, demanding that you send them out. Be genuine and be courteous. After all, you spent all those dollars and all that time planning the wedding of the season. You don’t want the last impression your guests receives to be a bad one.